Becoming a Sperm Donor

If you’re a healthy man aged between 21 and 45, we want to hear from you. 

For many couples, using donor sperm may be their only option for starting a family. But unfortunately there is often a shortage of sperm donors in Tasmania.

Why do we need sperm?

1 in 50 guys can’t father a child

1 in 8 infertile couples need donor sperm to have their children

And let’s not forget all the ‘single ladies’ and same sex couples. They too need your help to start a family!

You’re extraordinary (not ordinary)

Becoming a sperm donor can be one of the most generous things a man can do. There are 100's of reasons why men donate sperm - here are a few:

  • If you have children of your own, and want to share the gift of life and let others experience that joy
  • If you’re not ready to have children of your own, but want to help others
  • You’ve seen people who have struggled to create their own family
  • You might know someone who is trying to conceive and want to donate to them directly

Donating your sperm will have a powerful impact on you, the people who receive it, and, of course on the person born as a result of your donation.

Can I be a sperm donor?

To be a sperm donor, you must be a male Australian resident, preferably between 20 and 50. If you have a partner, we ask that they attend donor counselling sessions with you.

Can I be paid to be a sperm donor?

In Australia, it is illegal to take payment for human gametes (sperm). However, you can be reimbursed for any reasonable expenses you incur through the process of donating sperm, including things such as parking, travel and medical expenses. This is either paid by the recipient if they are known to you or by TasIVF.

Can I become a de-identified donor?

If there is a specific couple or individual that you wish to donate your sperm to, TasIVF can manage this process. Otherwise TasIVF actively recruits de-identified donors for any patients requiring access to donor sperm.

Clinic recruited, de-identified sperm donors remain anonymous up until the child turns 18. TasIVF maintains a secure register of all past donors, which the offspring of donors have the option to access when they turn 18.

Am I legally responsible for the offspring?

While any children created as a result of your donation will be your genetic offspring, legally and socially they will be the children of different parents. 

At TasIVF, we require all donors to have a three month cooling off period prior to donations as well as at least two counselling sessions with our counsellor. This is so you can make sure the decision you make is one you can live with for the rest of your life. It also helps ensure your decision will have positive implications for donor recipients and any resulting offspring.

How do I become a sperm donor?

If you're considering sperm donation, please make an appointment to talk to our Donor Coordinator, either face to face or over the phone, to get more  detail on the sperm donation process. This will include the kinds of tests you’ll be required to undergo, including infectious disease and genetic testing, and your rights and responsibilities as a donor. Counselling is compulsory for donors, recipients and their respective partners to ensure everyone involved is prepared.

Of course, we treat any donor enquiry, and all aspects of care and treatment, with the utmost privacy and confidentiality.

Using donors in IVF is a specialist area, and TasIVF coordinates our donor program to ensure it meets all ethical and legislative guidelines and standards.

Watch a video on the sperm donation process

Steps you take when becoming a donor

If you're interested in becoming a sperm donor phone 03 6212 7700 or email the donor team today.