Sperm Freezing | TasIVF
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This section of the TasIVF website is made exclusively available to GPs, Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

For more information, please contact us.

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The Fertility Forum is exclusively made available to TasIVF patients, to allow them to share their experiences and support each other through their fertility treatments.

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Sperm Freezing

Medical fertility preservation for men

Treatment for cancer or serious illness may affect sperm quality or production. Freezing your sperm before treatment can preserve your chances of having a family when you’re well again.

If you’re considering freezing sperm, make sure you discuss it with your treating specialist straight away. He or she may refer you directly to a TasIVF fertility specialist, depending on the urgency of your situation.

Don’t leave it too late

Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can both affect sperm production, temporarily or permanently. Please bear this in mind, as once your treatment begins, it may be too late to collect and freeze your sperm.

Even if your sperm profile is poor, due to your illness or for other reasons, we can usually store enough to use for IVF at a later date.

Other reasons to freeze sperm

Of course, treatment for cancer or serious illness isn’t the only reason men choose to freeze sperm – it’s also an option if you travel overseas a lot or work in dangerous situations.

How does sperm freezing work?

You provide a sperm sample in a private room at the TasIVF clinic. Our scientists then prepare and freeze the sperm as soon as possible ensuring the best survival rate when we thaw your sperm for use.

If you can’t produce a sperm sample – or if there are no sperm in the semen – we may be able to collect sperm directly with a testicular biopsy. The amount of sperm we collect this way is quite small, but should give us enough to freeze and use for IVF at a later date.

Only about 25-50 per cent of sperm survive the process of freezing and thawing, but they can be stored for many years.

Contact TasIVF for more information on Fertility Preservation.

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